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STYLE SPOTLIGHT: MORGANITE ENGAGEMENT RINGS

Morganite engagement ring set in rose gold



As the trend towards alternatives to diamond engagement rings continues, some couples are discovering gemstones they may never have considered a couple decades ago. One of the most popular varieties is morganite, a pale pink stone in the same family as emerald and aquamarine. Thanks to the rise of “Millennial pink”, morganite has become a sought-after gemstone that no one could have predicted—and it seems to be here to stay. If you’re considering the possibility of a morganite engagement ring, here’s what you need to know.




WHAT IS MORGANITE?

Named after J.P. Morgan, one of the greatest financiers in history, morganite is a variety of beryl, a clear mineral that forms in hexagonal crystals. Ranging anywhere from pale pink to coral, the stone is often heat-treated to eliminate traces of yellow or orange and get the coveted clear pale blush or rose color that most people are after. According to some, morganite attracts compassion, assurance, healing and promise—all important aspects of a long and happy marriage.
Morganite engagement ring on a white fabric




MORGANITE VS. DIAMOND

When many people think “engagement” they think diamond, but morganite is gaining in popularity among couples who are less concerned with tradition. Not sure if a morganite engagement ring is right for you? The gemstone you choose ultimately comes down to your priorities. Here’s how morganite compares to a diamond:
Stone Features Morganite Diamond
Color Pink, Coral Usually colorless
Popularity Less common, gaining in popularity Most popular engagement ring stone
Mohs Scale (durability) 7.5-8 10
Style Modern, feminine, unique Traditional, timeless, versatile
Brilliance High High
Popular Shape Pear, Cushion, Square Princess, Round, Emerald




WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN MORGANITE